Tuesday, August 31, 2010

Iranian Battlefield Surveillance

Iranian Battlefield Surveillance


Ground and Coastal Surveillance Radar


GSR-110S/Basir-110S

Basir-110D

GSR-110PS

Frequency:

Ku-band

X-band

X-band

Range – Person:

2.8 km

18 km

5 km

Range – Light Vehicle:

5 km

30 km

12 km

Range – Heavy Vehicle:

6.5 km

40 km

15 km

Range – Helicopter:

NA

30 km

12 km

Accuracy (range/azimuth):

+10m / +21.85 mils

+10m/+10 mils

+10m/+10 mils

Detectable Target Velocity:

3-100 km/h

3.5 – 103 km/h

3.5 – 103 km/h

Weight:

25 kg

125 kg

117 kg


Ground-based surveillance radars are designed for all-weather short range tactical surveillance of borders, coastal regions, and perimeter defense designed to detect moving ground targets and low-flying aircraft. In Iran they are being used on their Eastern border to cover a geographically vast area and prevent incursions from Pakistan and Afghanistan. The radars can also be used for spotting targets for artillery.

The GSR-110S otherwise known as the Basir-110S is an especially short ranged model, with emphasis on mobility. It runs on a self-contained power unit and can be mounted on a tripod, a vehicle or on a mast for extended range. According to IEI, it boasts high ECCM capability, low probability of intercept (LPI), automatic/remote control, excellent background filtering, track-while-scan capability, and solid-state components.


****As Always, click the pictures for a larger view****



The Basir-110D is a reverse engineered copy of the French Rasit radar which itself is ground-based, medium range pulse Doppler surveillance radar. The system is nominally man portable, but more frequently mounted on vehicles. Like the GSR-110S, it includes a solid state receiver, digital processing, automatic/remote control, LPI, GPS capability, and background filtering.


The GSR-110PS is almost identical to the Basir-110D in terms of appearance, in fact, there are no discernible differences and the only differences are a slight variation in weight, and a radical difference in range. The purpose of having two nearly identical systems, but with one having severely decreased performance is unknown.


Optical Surveillance


IRLRSP

Sadad-102C

Sadad-102CT

Sadad 201T

Camera Resolution:

752x582

NA

NA

NA

Camera Zoom:

100x

NA

NA

NA

Camera FOV:

NA

26

26

26

Laser Rangefinder Range:

20 km

NA

NA

NA

Night Vision:

Cooled Thermal

NA

Thermal

Cooled Thermal

Traverse:

360

340

340

360

Elevation:

-10 – 100

+40

+40

+90

Weight:

80 kg

NA

NA

NA

NA = Unknown or not applicable


Optical surveillance like the Sadad series are used in the same manner as ground radars, to provide short range surveillance capabilities focused primarily on protecting borders. These systems listed below are largely modular and are often seen in various combinations with other devices such as laser rangefinders or additional cameras. Unlike the radars though, optical systems are often slaved to weapons giving them defensive capability as well.


The lightest platform is the man-portable ‘Infrared-Long-Range-Surveillance-Platform’ (IRLRSP) which incorporates a daylight camera, laser range-finder and thermal imaging mounted onto a tripod. It features automatic search and track, as well as the ability to data link with radar or other fire control mechanism. It has been displayed with a missile-guidance-set (MGS) which indicates it is paired with the TOW ATGM.


The Sadad-102C/102CT is fairly basic, being only general surveillance cameras. The Sadad-201T on the other hand is designed for air defense as well as conventional ground and coastal surveillance. Recently, they’ve been seen mounted on trucks painted in the IRIAFAD signature camouflage scheme as well as being used on the Mesbah-1 CIWS. The platform usually incorporates thermal imaging cameras, daylight cameras and laser rangefinders – however, they appear to be highly modular, varying highly from one to



This unknown variant of the Sadad (presumably) was seen during IRGC coastal defense wargames in Spring of 2010.